Meet Our Staff


Professional Staff

The Counseling Center’s permanent staff consists of a Director, an Associate Director, two Assistant Directors, and six other counseling psychologists. The university psychiatrist and psychiatric clinical nurse specialist are adjunct staff members. In addition, there are four predoctoral interns, several graduate assistants, and 5 to14 doctoral practicum students working at the Center. Three full-time secretaries provide staff support.

 

Victor W. Barr, Ph.D., Director

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1989
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Service Provider

Center Activities:
General Counseling Center management; member of Vice Chancellor’s staff; member University Case Management Team and Threat Assessment Team; membership on various university committees; consultation with faculty, staff and administration; supervision; individual and couples psychotherapy.

Theoretical Style:
Cognitive/dynamic orientation with a strong emphasis on experiential components in therapy.

Professional Interests:
National data on counseling centers; clients with complex symptomology; differential diagnosis; brief psychotherapy, supervision; factors affecting retention of students; evaluation models; headaches; sleep.

Supervision Model:
“I view finding one’s voice in therapy as a primary developmental task of supervision at the intern level. Conceptualization is a central concern for this process. The content of supervisory sessions is dependent on the developmental level of the supervisee and the needs of the client. Sometimes supervision is processing counter-transference, sometimes teaching; sometimes acting as a referral source. At times, it is assisting supervisees in discovering what they are experiencing or, it is modeling skills and techniques. Sometimes it involves modeling the role of a client to assist in conceptualization.”

 

 

Melissa A. Bartsch, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist/Practicum Coordinator

University of Tennessee, 2004
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Service Provider

Center Activities:
Provide individual, couples, and group therapy; provide supervision; teach doctoral practicum courses; serve on university and community committees such as the university’s Safe Zone program and the Division of Student Life Diversity Committee, as well as Counseling Center committees for training and for community intervention; provide consultation to faculty, staff and administration; and participate in various outreach activities.

Theoretical Style:
Orientation combines interpersonal process with feminist and emotionally-focused approaches.

Professional Interests:
Addictive/compulsive behaviors, LGBT issues, relational issues, Veterans’ concerns, women’s issues, training and supervision.

Supervision Model:
“I work with supervisees from a developmental perspective and adapt my approach to their needs, goals, and skill level. I tend to be more structured in my approach with newer trainees and with more advanced trainees I encourage them to create the structure that they want and/or need from supervision and from me. I believe one of the most important training experiences for any supervisee is the development of their own authentic voice and this belief guides my work as a supervisor. I encourage supervisees to attend to interpersonal process and engage them in this process through use of self and through modeling these skills in supervision. I work to create an environment in which supervisees feel safe to explore their own processes both personally and professionally.”

 

 

connieConnie S. Briscoe, Ph.D., Assistant Director/ Director of Community Intervention

University of Tennessee, Counseling Psychology, 2002
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Service Provider

Center Activities:
Coordinating the management of Center community intervention; participating on various university, center, and community committees; providing group, individual, crisis,  and couples therapy; providing supervision and training; consulting with faculty, staff and administration; participating in various outreach activities.

Theoretical Style:
Orientation combines interpersonal process with feminist and cognitive-behavioral approaches.

Supervision Model:
“My supervision model is based on a developmental approach.  As I work with supervisees, I try to carefully assess the developmental level they are at with regard to the specific activities they are engaging in under my supervision and to adapt my supervision style accordingly. I also try to be aware of where supervisees are in terms of self and other awareness, motivation, and autonomy.  I believe the supervisor/trainee relationship is a valuable tool and try to provide a safe, collaborative, mutually empathic and empowering relationship with my supervisees.  I try to do this by being empathic, balancing positive and negative feedback, balancing challenge and support, and being available to consult when necessary.”

 

 

 

Philip Johnson, Ph.D., Assistant Director/Director of Training

Oklahoma State University, 1989
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Service Provider

Center Activities:
Internship/Practicum program administration; individual and couples therapy; supervision; outreach and consultation with faculty, staff, campus ministers and various university organizations.

Theoretical Style:
Orientation combines developmental, cognitive behavioral and family systems with interpersonal process psychotherapy.

Professional Interests:
Training and supervision; family of origin and spiritual issues.

Supervision Model:
“My supervision model is based on a developmental approach while encouraging awareness and understanding of process issues and the counselor’s use of self in therapy. I believe that understanding the emotional reaction of therapists is a very helpful tool in conceptualization, and I strive to create a supervisory relationship of respect, safety and support in which issues or reactions can be discussed. An emphasis is placed on the use of videotaping for the purpose of case conceptualization and self-examination. Supervisees will be encouraged to try new techniques that facilitate client change while being supported in developing their own therapeutic style and theoretical orientation. I emphasize the transitions of professional growth that occur during the internship year.”

 

 

T. Paul McAnear, Ph.D., Assistant Director/Director of Clinical Services

University of Tennessee, 2004
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Service Provider

Center Activities:
Clinical services administration; individual, group, and couples psychotherapy; Stress and Wellness services; supervision and training; community intervention activities. Specific tasks include Substance Use Management group (SUM), an Emotion Management Skills group (EMS), Intern assessment seminar; Case Management Team (Student Affairs), and QPR (suicide prevention) presentations.

Theoretical Style:
“I use an integrative, pragmatic, client-centered approach focused on helping clients identify and progress toward their goals. Recognizing that the quality of the therapeutic relationship is a central empirically supported factor in effective therapy, I emphasize the therapeutic relationship and use of self in helping a client make lasting changes. My interventions are informed by psychodynamic, interpersonal, cognitive-behavioral, and solution-focused therapies.  I rely heavily on Motivational Interviewing styled techniques to enhance the treatment alliance and to prepare clients for change.”

Professional Interests:
Therapeutic effectiveness, assessment and diagnosis, substance use management and harm reduction, impact of childhood abuse on current functioning; positive, solution-focused interventions; group dynamics and teamwork; fatherhood and men’s issues; forgiveness and spirituality; grief management.

Supervision Model:
“I utilize a developmental model of supervision that focuses on providing the structure and guidance appropriate to the individual needs of the supervisee. My goal is to facilitate a supervisee’s development of a therapeutic identity and style that is both genuine and clinically effective.  I see supervision as a collaborative process where a supervisee’s professional training, needs and goals are integrated with excellent client care. My fundamental and sometimes annoying question with each trainee is, ‘what does your client want and how can you help them get it?'”

 

 

Suzanne L. Molnar, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist

University of Florida, 1982
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Services Provider

Center activities:
Supervision and training; individual and couples psychotherapy; group therapy; consultation/liaison with Women’s Athletics Department; assessment.

Other professional activities:
APA internship accreditation site visitor; member of the Chancellor’s Commission for LGBT People.

Theoretical style:
Eclectic, with an emphasis on family systems. Techniques are drawn from client?centered, cognitive behavioral, Gestalt, motivational interviewing, and family systems approaches. Professional interests: Supervision and training; eating disorders treatment; couples counseling; GLBT issues.

Supervision model:
“Developmental. My preferred supervision relationship is supportive and consultative, but my role varies from teacher to consultant to mentor depending on the immediate needs of the supervisee. Because of my emphasis on client?therapist process, I view supervisees’ tapes regularly. My other emphases in supervision are client conceptualization, therapeutic choice points, working with counter transference, and facilitating the supervisee’s development of a personally congruent yet flexible style.”

 

 

Park photoSarah J. Park, Psy.D., Staff Psychologist

Loma Linda University, 2012
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Service Provider

Center Activities:Individual and group psychotherapy; center diversity and training committees.

Theoretical Style: “I theorize from a Gestalt perspective which means I am concerned with a client’s history and how that impacts their present, I also pay close attention to the relationship in the room, and I attend to the client’s process. I encourage creativity and experimentation in the therapy room.”

Supervision Model: “I work from the Stoltenberg Integrative Development Model of supervision. I work to meet supervisees where they are developmentally and endeavor to help them stretch and grow both as a therapist and as a person.”

 

 

 

AshleyAshley Ross, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist

Tennessee State University, 2007
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Services Provider

Center activities:
Supervision and training; individual and couples psychotherapy; group therapy; consultation/liaison.

Theoretical Style:
I conceptualize my clients from a broad dynamic approach, which includes object relation, interpersonal, and family system. In sessions, I use the interpersonal process to deepen the experience of therapy and promote change. I frequently engage in emotionally focused, here-and-now interactions. In addition, I am mindful of transference/countertransference issues and employ a use-of-self approach.”

Professional interests:
Trauma survivors, family-of-origin issues, men’s issues, supervision, intimate partner violence, spirituality.

Supervision model:
“Supervision is the foundation of becoming a confident, competent clinician. I believe supervision is a playful, creative process and I enjoy it as much as I enjoy providing therapy.  In many ways, my supervision style mirrors my approach to therapy. I generally take a psychodynamic/interpersonal stance and work on creating a trusting environment. I believe that supervision is a reciprocal interaction, both exciting and informative. While taking into consideration the supervisee’s developmental level, I try to deepen his/her ability to conceptualize clients so that interventions are timely, focused, and more effective. This involves discussing several aspects of the therapeutic relationship, such as, emotional reactions regarding the client or parallel processes that may be occurring. During supervision, I may share my own professional experiences as a clinician­-both my successes and blunders­- in an attempt to normalize the supervisee’s experiences and possible fears at this developmental crossroad.”

 

kenliKenli Urruty, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist

Utah State University, 2012
Licensed Counseling Psychologist and Health Services Provider

Center Activities: Individual, group, and couples psychotherapy; community intervention and outreach; consultation/liaison; training and supervision

Theoretical Style:“My work with clients is informed by existential-humanistic, emotion focused, and interpersonal approaches.”

Supervision Model: “I utilize a developmental model in my work with supervisees. I try to meet the supervisee where he or she is at and develop a collaborative supervisory relationship aimed at building skill and competence. I encourage all my supervisees to strive for authenticity both in supervision and in their work with clients. My belief is that the supervisory relationship is an important part of a therapist’s growth, and I seek to create a supervisory relationship that is supportive and safe, where supervisees feel empowered to take risks and push themselves in their work.”